illustration Musée de la Résistance et de la Déportation de Besançon illustration Musée de la Résistance et de la Déportation de Besançon illustration Musée de la Résistance et de la Déportation de Besançon illustration Musée de la Résistance et de la Déportation de Besançon illustration Musée de la Résistance et de la Déportation de Besançon

Musée de France logo Besançon Resistance and Deportation Museum Passeur d'Histoire(s), a civic tool

The Musée de la Résistance et de la Déportation in Besançon is one of the most important in France.
It houses some extraordinary collections, including a collection of deportation art comprising over 600 small paintings, statuettes and drawings produced clandestinely in the Reich's prisons and concentration camps.

Not recommended for children under 10.

View of Besançon, Pont de Battant, during the Second World War.
Liberation of Besançon, September 8, 1944 © Musée de la Résistance et de la Déportation de Besançon

A new museum

After more than 10 years of reflection and 3 years of renovation work, the Musée de la Résistance et de la Déportation reopened its doors on September 8, 2023.

The museum's exceptional collections include over 600 small paintings, statuettes and drawings created clandestinely in the Reich's prisons and concentration camps.

The museum's exhibition spaces have been redesigned around the key idea of the "History Museum as a tool for citizens", which places the emphasis on questioning, knowledge and perspective, and on history as critical knowledge.

It now offers 3 distinct exhibition areas:

  • A transformed permanent exhibition space
  • A temporary exhibition space, featuring a new exhibition every year
  • A space dedicated to deported art, the museum's treasure trove, one of the largest collections in Europe.

Since its creation, the museum's collections have been built up thanks to donors, illustrating the sometimes intimate bond between the establishment, the witnesses and their families.

Just a stone's throw from the museum, the Monument du Témoin pays tribute to those who were deported.

The Fusillés monument commemorates the sacrifice of 98 members of the Resistance, condemned to death and executed by the German army between 1941 and 1944. It was restored as part of the museum's renovation.

miniature gallery
The Witness
miniature gallery
The monument of the posts of the shootings
Objects made to celebrate the Liberation Studio Bernardot

Collection for the 80th anniversary of the Liberation

This year, we are celebrating the 80th anniversary of the Liberation of Besançon.

In this context, the Museum of Resistance and Deportation is calling on you: do you have photos, archives or objects related to the Liberation?

Send us an e-mail at transmettre.mrdb@citadelle.besancon.fr.

Le Verfügbar aux enfers, Germaine Tillion, Ravensbrück, 1944
© Studio Bernardot

Highlights to discover

Embodying the museum's historical themes, discover these collections.

Discover the collections

Photo of an object from the collection, letter from a prisoner.

Some of our collections are available
online.

Discover other rare collections on the Mémoire vive website of the City of Besançon.

Lecture series: Émile Bravo - Spirou, l'espoir malgré tout

Focus on ...

Lecture series: Émile Bravo - Spirou, l'espoir malgré tout

 

The Musée de la Résistance et de la Déportation in Besançon has invited cartoonist and scriptwriter Émile Bravo to present his series Spirou, l'espoir malgré tout. The author takes up the famous character of Spirou in a 5-volume story, and imagines his youth in Belgium during the Second World War.

 

At once touching, funny and educational, this comic strip draws young and old into a fictional story firmly rooted in a documented historical context.

The museum's cherished questions about civic engagement, society's reaction to totalitarianism and solidarity punctuate a story that reveals the daily lives and difficulties of civilians during the war.

 

Émile Bravo is a comic strip author. He began his career in publishing and children's illustration. In 2008, he published Journal d'un ingénu, setting the famous Spirou character in Brussels just before the Second World War. This tome is the genesis of the Spirou, l'espoir malgré tout series, in which the author depicts the life of the little bellboy during the war. Since the critical and popular success of his saga, Émile Bravo has been sharing his work and research with the public.

 

Practical information
Thursday June 13, 2024 at 6:00 pm,
salle Courbet, access via 2 or 6 rue Mégevand, Besançon
Free